The number of Americans living with Alzheimer's is growing — and growing fast. An estimated 5.8 million Americans of all ages are living with Alzheimer’s dementia in 2019.
  • One in 10 people age 65 and older (10 percent) has Alzheimer's dementia.
  • Almost two-thirds of Americans with Alzheimer's are women.
  • Older African-Americans are about twice as likely to have Alzheimer's or other dementias as older whites.
  • Hispanics are about one and one-half times as likely to have Alzheimer's or other dementias as older whites.
  • In 2019, Alzheimer’s and other dementias will cost the nation $290 billion, including $195 billion in Medicare and Medicaid payments.
  • Unless a treatment to slow, stop or prevent the disease is developed, in 2050, Alzheimer's is projected to cost more than $1.1 trillion (in 2019 dollars).
  • This dramatic rise includes more than four-fold increases both in government spending under Medicare and Medicaid and in out-of-pocket spending.

As the number of older Americans grows rapidly, so too will the number of new and existing cases of Alzheimer's. By 2050, the number of people age 65 and older with Alzheimer’s dementia may grow to a projected 13.8 million, barring the development of medical breakthroughs to prevent, slow or cure Alzheimer’s disease.

10 Early Signs and Symptoms of Alzheimer's


Memory loss that disrupts daily life may be a symptom of Alzheimer's or other dementia. Alzheimer's is a brain disease that causes a slow decline in memory, thinking and reasoning skills. There are 10 warning signs and symptoms. If you notice any of them, don't ignore them. Schedule an appointment with your doctor.

Memory loss that disrupts daily life: One of the most common signs of Alzheimer’s disease, especially in the early stage, is forgetting recently learned information. Others include forgetting important dates or events, asking for the same questions over and over, and increasingly needing to rely on memory aids (e.g., reminder notes or electronic devices) or family members for things they used to handle on their own.

What's a typical age-related change?
Sometimes forgetting names or appointments, but remembering them later.

Challenges in planning or solving problems: Some people living with dementia may experience changes in their ability to develop and follow a plan or work with numbers. They may have trouble following a familiar recipe or keeping track of monthly bills. They may have difficulty concentrating and take much longer to do things than they did before.

What's a typical age-related change?
Making occasional errors when managing finances or household bills.

Difficulty completing familiar tasks: People with Alzheimer's often find it hard to complete daily tasks. Sometimes they may have trouble driving to a familiar location, organizing a grocery list or remembering the rules of a favorite game.

What's a typical age-related change?
Occasionally needing help to use microwave settings or to record a TV show.

Confusion with time or place: People living with Alzheimer's can lose track of dates, seasons and the passage of time. They may have trouble understanding something if it is not happening immediately. Sometimes they may forget where they are or how they got there.

What's a typical age-related change?
Getting confused about the day of the week, but figuring it out later.

Trouble understanding visual images and spatial relationships: For some people, vision problems is a sign of Alzheimer's. This may lead to difficulty with balance or trouble reading. They may also have problems judging distance and determining color or contrast, causing issues with driving.

What's a typical age-related change?
Vision changes related to cataracts.

New problems with words in speaking or writing: People living with Alzheimer's may have trouble following or joining a conversation. They may stop in the middle of a conversation and have no idea how to continue or they may repeat themselves. They may struggle with vocabulary, have trouble naming a familiar object or use the wrong name (e.g., calling a "watch" a "hand-clock").

What's a typical age-related change?
Sometimes having trouble finding the right word.

Misplacing things and losing the ability to retrace steps: A person living with Alzheimer's disease may put things in unusual places. They may lose things and be unable to go back over their steps to find them again. He or she may accuse others of stealing, especially as the disease progresses.

What's a typical age-related change?
Misplacing things from time to time and retracing steps to find them.

Decreased or poor judgment: Individuals may experience changes in judgment or decision-making. For example, they may use poor judgment when dealing with money or pay less attention to grooming or keeping themselves clean.

What's a typical age-related change?
Making a bad decision or mistake once in a while, like neglecting to change the oil in the car.

Withdrawal from work or social activities: A person living with Alzheimer’s disease may experience changes in the ability to hold or follow a conversation. As a result, he or she may withdraw from hobbies, social activities or other engagements. They may have trouble

keeping up with a favorite team or activity.

What's a typical age-related change?
Sometimes feeling uninterested in family or social obligations.

Changes in mood and personality: Individuals living with Alzheimer’s may experience mood and personality changes. They can become confused, suspicious, depressed, fearful or anxious. They may be easily upset at home, with friends or when out of their comfort zone.

What's a typical age-related change?
Developing very specific ways of doing things and becoming irritable when a routine is disrupted.

Home Care:
This can allow a person with Alzheimer's or other dementia to stay in his or her own home. It also can be of great assistance to caregivers.

A home is an important part of an individual’s life. A home is where we feel safe and most at ease. The familiarity of being at home gives one a sense of stability, and for patients with Alzheimer’s disease, this is important. There are many advantages of home care for Alzheimer’s patients, including monitoring the symptoms, ensuring healthy eating habits are maintained, receiving physician-approved physical therapy treatments, along with making the patient as comfortable as possible while dealing with a progressive disease.

Questions to ask potential in-home providers

  • Are you trained in first aid and CPR?
  • Do you have experience working with someone with dementia?
  • Are you trained in dementia care?
  • Are you with an agency?
  • Are you bonded (protects clients from potential losses caused by the employee)?
  • Are you able to provide references?
  • Are you available at the times needed?
  • Are you able to provide back-up, if sick?
  • Are you able to manage our specific health and behavioral care needs?
Event

UPCOMING EVENT

Navigating the Hospital Partnership Part 2 Date: Jul 30 - Dec 31Start time: 9am REGISTER NOW